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One of the world's rarest plants is blooming again in a secret UK location |  Enjoying nature

One of the world's rarest plants is blooming again in a secret UK location | Enjoying nature

Cotoneaster cambricus was once on the brink of extinction, with only six specimens left in the wild. iNaturalist / Matthew Jones / Creative Commons

One of the rarest plants in the world, the Cotoneaster cambricus30 specimens were successfully reintroduced into the wild at a secret location, increasing the number of living specimens of the species to 110 in the world. Plants growing on cliffs in North Wales were once on the brink of extinction. Six known individuals live in the wild.

A Cotoneaster cambricus It was abundant in the 18th century, but led to overgrazing of sheep, goats and cattle in its natural habitat. Chester Zoo in the United Kingdom started a successful attempt to raise the species in a nursery.

Members of Chester Zoo in the United Kingdom cultivate rare species in a vivarium – Photo: Chester Zoo / Disclosure

“To see our team grow these plants from cuttings, and years later, finally return to the wild, giving hope to these species, is a remarkable feeling. We are delighted to be a part of this important, collaborative effort. Cotoneaster cambricusFrom that One of the rarest plants in the world“, he said Richard HewittFor Nursery Group Manager, website IFL Science.

Cotoneaster cambricus was originally cultivated at Chester Zoo in the United Kingdom – Photo: Chester Zoo / Disclosure

30 of the reintroduced specimens were planted with special protection measures to keep them safe from any livestock that might pass by. Their numbers are expected to continue to increase as they begin to flower and grow from seedlings without the risk of plant chewing.

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“Garden of 30 Cotoneaster cambricus “This month's launch is the culmination of 7 years of work between a large group of partner organizations in collecting seeds, testing germination techniques and creating the right conditions for the plants to be reintroduced into their original habitat.” Rosie CressmanSenior Horticultural Technician at Trevorth Botanic Gardens, Bangor University, Wales.

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