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Large sunspot explosions leave scientists on alert

Large sunspot explosions leave scientists on alert

The explosions were captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory

summary
The Sun led a series of activity last Saturday with X-magnitude solar flares, raising concern due to the presence of sunspot AR 3697. This intense activity increases the risk of new powerful explosions and their potential impacts on Earth.

Image 15 times larger than Earth, a spot on the sun that could affect the planet with solar storms in the world

Photo: Getty Images/Techmundo

Hey sun A series of activities took place last Saturday, June 1, with two solar flares of magnitude X, the most powerful on the scale.

Explosions captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory NASAIt released a huge amount of energy and caused concern among scientists, especially because of its presence Sunspots P. 3697.

Located at the center of the solar disk, AR 3697, also known as AR 3664, has already shown five X-class flares since its reappearance on May 27, including the massive X2.8.

Among other events, one X1.45 was fired on May 29, one X1.1 on May 31, and two X1.03 and X1.4 on June 1. This intense activity increases the risk of more powerful explosions and their potential impacts on Earth.

Why are they worried?

although rash June 1 was not accompanied by a package Coronal mass ejections (CMEs)which can cause Northern lights As it collides with Earth’s magnetosphere, AR 3697 continues to emit smaller flames daily.

On June 2, two M-class flares and ten C-class flares were recorded, with a 30% chance of new X-class flares in the coming days, according to Spaceweatherlive.

As the Sun approaches the peak of its 11-year cycle of activity, the scientific community remains on alert, closely monitoring the emergence of new sunspot regions and a potential increase in luminous events in the coming months.

These events can range from the failure of communications systems such as satellites, radios and GPS devices, to the occurrence of aurora borealis in areas closest to the poles.

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