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U.S. Capitol Assault Commission takes action in fragmented Congress | International

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The U.S. Congressional Commission of Inquiry into the Capitol attack on Tuesday, January 6, is taking action after a mob of Donald Trump supporters stormed the Temple of Democracy in an effort to prevent Joe Biden from becoming president. Five people, including a Capitol police officer, were killed in the attack, and lawmakers who testified to the Democrats’ victory were evacuated and fled in fear of losing their lives.

That devastating day resulted in an unprecedented historical event: for the first time, the President of the United States had to face a second indictment. Through the events of January 6, Donald Trump was accused of “inciting insurrection” because when his supporters attacked Capitol, he heard an insensitive speech urging them to “fight like the devil” in order to “recover” from the country. March to Congress. On Feb. 13, the Senate acquitted Trump of the charges following the Democrats’ failure to reach the magic number of 60 votes imposed by a parliamentary block (two-thirds of the House) that voted in favor of 57 Democratic senators, and 43 Republicans opposed.

From the outset, several Republicans attacked the creation of the commission as a non-democratic maneuver designed to mark Trump’s role in the Capitol Hill chaos. There is also a brigade that denies that Trump put pressure on his supporters Save America (Save America), to violently occupy Congress. About 800 people entered the building, damaged offices and clashed with police (140 officers were injured). More than 500 people have been charged in the events of the day, ranging from trespassing to assaulting police officers, and including acts of vandalism.

The confrontation between the head of the Chamber of Deputies, Nancy Pelosi and the Republicans in Congress has demonstrated the uncompromising divisions that have prevailed between the two parties over the past few months, which has made it difficult to set up a commission to investigate from the outset the attack on the Capitol. A major political storm was unleashed on July 1 when Pelosi announced that Republican Liz Cheney (daughter of George W. Bush’s vice president, 2001-2009) would be on the commission of inquiry. A few weeks before the announcement, Wyoming State Representative Capitol Hill was fired from his leadership position in the Republican Party for denying Trump’s unsubstantiated fraud allegations in the November presidential election.

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On July 21, Pelosi appointed eight members to the commission of inquiry, including seven Democrats and one Republican. Two days ago, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy announced that his party would recommend five events to examine the January events. On Wednesday, July 21, Pelosi said in a statement that he would reject the proposals of two of the five congressmen put forward by McCarthy, Jim Banks (Indiana) and Jim Jordan (Ohio), and that the Speaker of the House of Representatives would accept the other three recommendations as valid for his condemnation of the false doctrine of electoral fraud. McCarthy responded by removing all of his candidates from the negotiating table and warning that he would no longer appoint anyone else to the committee unless the five nominees already accepted were accepted.

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Aside from Cheney, Illinois Congressman Adam Kinsinger is the only member of the committee headed by Mississippi Representative Benny Thompson – who has chaired the Homeland Security Committee since 2019. Kinsinger was not a name proposed by the Republicans, but was included by Pelosi in the investigation of the most severe attack ever seen by the US Congress. Of course, if the party removes Cheney from his political leadership in Congress, the same will happen to Kinsinger. Both Congressmen may be expelled from their seats in the House of Representatives by their party.

Kinsinger “contributes with great patriotism to the work of the Commission: to obtain the facts and to defend democracy,” Pelosi said Sunday. By agreeing to join the task of finding the truth, the Republican made his goal clear: “Let me be clear, I am a Republican who believes in conservative values, who has vowed to support the Constitution, and I will always respond when duty calls me to the position I wanted or wanted, even if it was not.” Said.

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McCarthy, who responded to questions from the press on Monday during a ceremony in the White House garden, called Cheney and Kinsinger “Pelosi Republicans.” “Who? Adam and Liz?” The question was raised at the entrance of the room, Cheney responded to McCarthy’s words They say they are “very childish”.

Pelosi continues to defend the need for the Committee: “I believe that this Commission must act in a non-discriminatory manner to win the confidence of the American people. It is about patriotism.” “I am very proud of the team members and I hope they will achieve this goal. We must go back to ignoring the actions of those who do not want to find out the truth,” the Democrat declared.

In a last-ditch effort to present a “non-existent” picture of bipartisanship, Democrats unveiled the image of Liz Cheney and announced that they would release one of two preliminary reports on the investigation into the robbery of the daughter of former Bush vice president. . To the Capitol. Tuesday’s session will be dedicated to the four police officers who saved Congress their lives when they were subjected to verbal and physical abuse on January 6th.

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