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Scientists are getting more precise measurements of the Higgs boson

Scientists are getting more precise measurements of the Higgs boson

Researchers at the Large Linear Hadron Collider (LHC) have obtained the most precise measurement yet of the mass of the Higgs boson, a fundamental particle for understanding the Standard Model of particle physics.

The Higgs boson is an interesting particle, which arises from a quantum field that permeates the entire universe, giving mass to other fundamental particles.

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Hey Science Alert She stated that the study was Initially released in July. The measurement was obtained based on collisions of ultrafast protons inside the LHC.

The latest measurements were made over a period of four years, and about nine million Higgs boson particles were found.

  • Although only a small fraction of the experimentally produced Higgs bosons have been observed, researchers from the ATLAS team were able to obtain the most accurate mass yet for a Higgs boson;
  • Unlike other particles whose masses can be deduced theoretically, scientists must determine the mass of the Higgs boson through experiments;
  • Obtaining an accurate measurement is important to understand the interactions of the Higgs boson with other particles and itself;
  • The Higgs is a very interesting particle: it arises from a quantum field that emanates throughout the universe, giving mass to other fundamental particles;
  • Although the masses of other particles in the Standard Model of physics can be deduced from theory, physicists must grope their way relatively blindly through experiment to determine the Higgs mass.

The researchers combined mass measurements based on particle decay and more precise calibrations to obtain a Higgs boson mass of 125.11 GeV (GeV) with an uncertainty of 0.11 GeV.

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This represents a decrease from the mass of 125.35 GeV and an accuracy of 0.12% in 2019. “This result currently represents the most accurate measurement of the mass of the Higgs boson, with an accuracy of 0.09% in this fundamental quantity,” ATLAS members said in their report. conditionpublished in Physical review letters.

More precise measurements help physicists test predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics and detect possible deviations, if any exist.