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Peugeot 308 1.6 Hybrid 225 GT Premium Review 2022 UK

Peugeot 308 1.6 Hybrid 225 GT Premium Review 2022 UK

It’s a testament to how far Peugeot has come in recent times that even my wife, a minimal car enthusiast, saw this Peugeot 308 at our house and wanted to know more about it. Healthy sales in Europe (second only to VW) confirm this as the brand’s revitalization continues.

This particular 308 is the most powerful on sale, and has the potential to make things interesting, if not exactly GTi-lite. It’s a plug-in hybrid, with a 1.6-liter petrol engine mated to a 109 hp electric motor for a total of 221 hp and a front-wheel drive configuration via an eight-speed automatic transmission.

It sprints from 0-62mph in 7.5 seconds, just over a second behind the rival VW Golf GTE with its 243bhp. The difference in claimed CO2 emissions is close and 308 on the Buck – 26g/km, 27 on the VW – and it’s clear where Peugeot’s press releases are marketing this car. Fleet sales are high on the agenda. Electric range of 37 miles is about the same – we managed 35 miles on a hot summer day, and we weren’t too gentle on the throttle.

Incidentally, the Golf looks a bit cheaper on paper (£38,725) but the Peugeot comes with Alcantara and leather-effect seats as standard, and they’re £2,380 over the Golf, so it swings and turns.

The rest of the interior is smart, but not as user-friendly as some. The steering position still bothers me – Peugeot continues with a small, low steering system, so looking at the instruments is an exercise in strangulation.

But at least there are some switches under the touchscreen so it doesn’t run entirely on screen. Big menu buttons help too.

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On the road, the 225 PHEV 308 performs just like its ICE sibling. Our recent road test awarded the 1.2 petrol 4.5 stars for ‘handling and stability’, and this version performs admirably. Peugeot rediscovers its long-forgotten pedigree here, with grip, balance and overall flair that makes it as enjoyable to drive as it is to look at. Crucially, it’s not sacrificed on the altar of driving comfort.

It’s a testament to how far Peugeot has come in recent times that even my wife, a minimal car enthusiast, saw this Peugeot 308 at our house and wanted to know more about it. Healthy sales in Europe (second only to VW) confirm this as the brand’s revitalization continues.

This particular 308 is the most powerful on sale, and has the potential to make things interesting, if not exactly GTi-lite. It’s a plug-in hybrid, with a 1.6-liter petrol engine mated to a 109 hp electric motor for a total of 221 hp and a front-wheel drive configuration via an eight-speed automatic transmission.

It sprints from 0-62mph in 7.5 seconds, just over a second behind the rival VW Golf GTE with its 243bhp. The difference in claimed CO2 emissions is close and 308 on the Buck – 26g/km, 27 on the VW – and it’s clear where Peugeot’s press releases are marketing this car. Fleet sales are high on the agenda. Electric range of 37 miles is about the same – we managed 35 miles on a hot summer day, and we weren’t too gentle on the throttle.

Incidentally, the Golf looks a bit cheaper on paper (£38,725) but the Peugeot comes with Alcantara and leather-effect seats as standard, and they’re £2,380 over the Golf, so it swings and turns.

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The rest of the interior is smart, but not as user-friendly as some. The steering position still bothers me – Peugeot continues with a small, low steering system, so looking at the instruments is an exercise in strangulation.

But at least there are some switches under the touchscreen so it doesn’t run entirely on screen. Big menu buttons help too.

On the road, the 225 PHEV 308 performs just like its ICE sibling. Our recent road test awarded the 1.2 petrol 4.5 stars for ‘handling and stability’, and this version performs admirably. Peugeot rediscovers its long-forgotten pedigree here, with grip, balance and overall flair that makes it as enjoyable to drive as it is to look at. Crucially, it’s not sacrificed on the altar of driving comfort.