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In the United States, a 23-year-old woman graduates from college with her 88-year-old grandfather - Mary Clary Magazine

In the United States, a 23-year-old woman graduates from college with her 88-year-old grandfather – Mary Clary Magazine

In the United States, a 23-year-old woman graduates from college with her 88-year-old grandfather (Photo: Reproduction / NY Post)

Graduation Melanie Salazar, 23 years old, had a special taste. After a difficult time with the Covid-19 epidemic, she was able to complete her studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio in the United States with a special person: her grandfather, Rene Nira, 88 years old.

“When we were on stage, I felt overwhelmed with emotion,” he said in an interview. Good Morning America About the ceremony on December 11th. “Everything was quiet. I did not hear any applause or screams, but I was told that the whole stadium was engulfed in ecstasy.

At the same time that Melanie graduated from Communications, her grandfather also graduated with a degree in economics. Although the young woman began her studies in 2016 and completed them on time, Mr. Renee did not have that luck.

“Since the 1950s, he has been working as a graduate, and that has been one of the goals and dreams of his life,” he said. “But in the 1950s he fell in love, got married and started a family so he could not continue his studies immediately.”

He started his studies and then had to dedicate himself to his children and then got involved in other jobs and after getting a job in a bank, he never continued his studies. However, after the young woman finished high school, Nira joined her at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Once they enter college together, they can study at each other’s company and go there together.

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Once the epidemic began, he was determined and strong, focusing on distance learning, not letting himself get tired. Wanting his grandfather to finally fulfill his dream of graduating from college, Salazar and his family asked university officials to recognize Nira’s efforts, even though she did not receive enough credit to graduate. They agree.

“As his health was deteriorating, we really pushed him because we believed he would have that memory before he died,” he said. “I am so proud of myself and my grandfather. I am so grateful to be able to share this moment, this memory with him, ”she concluded.