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Como as marcas reagiram à renúncia de Boris Johnson

How brands reacted to Boris Johnson’s resignation


July 11, 2022 – 06:00

By Alexandra Jardine, to AdAge*

Boris Johnson announced last week that he will step down as UK Prime Minister, after a series of scandals, distrust, several accusations of lying, and finally the resignations of several ministers and more than 50 members of his cabinet.

Johnson did not leave voluntarily, clearly referring to Westminster’s “herd instinct” and “Darwinism” way of selecting leaders in his resignation letter. But his passing has already led to many brands making jokes about many of the stories associated with his colorful personality, including his insincerity, penchant for partying, dog ownership and more.

Meanwhile, British newspapers also used her famous creations in the headlines. ‘Depart means depart’, referring to the Brexit slogan, ‘Leave a way to leave’, was the headline of the British tabloid metro, while The Economist chose ‘Clownfall’ or ‘clown Fall’ on Friday. , 8.

Here are some of the brands’ reactions to the PM’s announcement:

Whopper one too

Johnson has been accused of lying multiple times throughout his career, including about partying in Downing Street during the coronavirus shutdown and, last week, about his knowledge of sexual assault allegations against Conservative MP Chris Pincher.

Burger King took advantage of this by sending a truck with a giant digital billboard to drive around Westminster, emblazoned with the copy: “There are so many huge” on the number 10, referring to the English politician’s home address. BBH was behind the creation, with PR agency Splendid coordinating paid and amplification media.

(Credit: Burger King/Disclosure)


New job?

Let’s forget about the great chapter. British politics has seen a mass shutdown this week, with more than 50 Conservative Party members resigning from government posts in protest of Johnson’s behaviour. This is more important than any other prime minister in history.

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KFC and parent agency London have ridiculed this in a series of posts on social media with posts with text such as “Former Cabinet Secretary? We’re hiring”. They also created a website dedicated to advertising work at KFC near Westminster. The opening message? “If you prefer to work in a warm and welcoming environment with supportive and trustworthy leadership, we are always on the lookout for people.”

party center

Real estate website Zoopla capitalized on Johnson’s impending move from Downing Street with an ad for the lucky generals that appeared in the Sun newspaper on Friday morning. “Looking for eight beds with room to entertain?” The piece shows – a reference to the many parties that allegedly took place at the Prime Minister’s Residence during the COVID lockdowns.

Reducing dog stress

In addition to his party and complicated relationship with the truth, Johnson is also known as the father of a pet. His dog Dylan has appeared in many stories about his driving, including when Johnson revealed that Jack Russell’s cross could not control his romantic impulses.

Pet insurance brand Manitas, which has just launched a campaign with Uncommon about the wellness benefits of pet ownership, sent a pickup truck to Downing Street to remind you that Dylan will be there to relieve any stress as he looks for his next career step.

(credit: Disclosure/Manets)

Bye bye drinks

Johnson has defended his right to hold farewell parties for employees during pandemic lockdowns, describing several occasions as “work events”.

Brewdog beer brand Take advantage of it on Twitter, giving consumers the option to vote on brand name beers to brew for their brews, asking “Is it too late to start brewing for a business event?” Beer names include “Resigned Nation”, “Boris Lee-Bae” and “Bye bye Big Dog” (a reference to the “Save the Big Dog” campaign to keep Johnson in office in early 2022).

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* Translated by Sarah Ledis