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A volcano eruption in Iceland is twice the normal rate; Follow the live broadcast

Icelandic scientists reported that a lava flow from the volcano on the Reykjanes Peninsula, near the Icelandic capital Reykjavik, erupted with double force as usual. The volcano erupted two months ago and showed no signs of stopping, much to the surprise of the scientists.

“It is unusual for the rash to increase in its eighth week and there are no indications that we will see this pause.” Geophysicist Magnús Tumi Guðmundsson told RÚV, Iceland’s National Broadcasting Service, “This is a different kind of volcanic eruption that we are used to seeing.”

Data shows that 95% of rashes are stronger initially and then lose energy gradually or suddenly.

The eruption near Fagradalsfjall appears to be an exception to this rule. “There has been a significant increase in the pyroclastic flow at Fagradalsfjall in the past few weeks,” a press release from the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland confirmed.

The increased lava flow appears to satisfy sources of lava that are regularly released into the air. The volcano’s new lava field now covers 1.8 square kilometers and has a total mass of about 30 million cubic meters.

Photo: Erez Marom / Reuters

Most of the eruptions originate from a rocky chamber beneath a central volcano. Chamber pressure and volume determine the duration and size of the rash. “But this rash appears to be dominated by the rash channel and how much it can carry. The university report says that” the channel that opened was particularly narrow and long “- adding that evidence indicates that it widens over time.

Magns Tumi says the data confirms what many felt instinctively: the volcanic eruption is getting bigger and bigger. “It wasn’t certain before, as the previous stable eruption has become more volatile, so it’s difficult to compare,” he said.

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